A cruise ship against a golden sunset on the ocean.

Can You Cruise the Bermuda Triangle?

Joshua Slocum, the first man to sail solo around the world in 1895, never returned after setting sail from the United States East Coast for Grand Cayman. On January 30, 1948, a British Tudor IV plane flying from England to Bermuda disappeared without a trace. The same thing happened a year later, on January 17, 1949, when another Tudor IV plane left Bermuda.

On November 3, 1978, while watching a plane’s red and green lights approach for a landing, a controller recounts losing sight of the lights. The airplane completely disappeared from the radar. 

These strange records are what have made the Bermuda Triangle famous. So why would anyone set sail directly into this area of doom? Let’s learn more about how you can take a cruise to one of the most mysterious places on Earth.

A cruise ship against a golden sunset on the ocean.

What Is the Bermuda Triangle?

The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, is a region in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean. Its infamy lies in the mysterious disappearance of numerous aircraft and ships.

The region ranges from Bermuda in the northeast to Puerto Rico directly south. Its triangular point reaches the southeastern Florida border.

A diagram of the area between southeastern Florida, Bermuda, and San Juan, Puerto Rico known as the Bermuda Triangle.
The Bermuda Triangle | NOAA’s National Ocean Service | CC BY 2.0 | Image via Flickr

Because many can’t agree on the exact region, the area could be anywhere from 500,000 to 1.5 million square miles. The Bermuda Triangle is not recognized as an official region of the Atlantic Ocean.

Furthermore, the Bermuda Triangle is actually one of the most heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the world. It’s also the location of the deepest point in the Atlantic Ocean, the Milwaukee Depth. The Puerto Rico Trench, where the Milwaukee Depth is, reaches a depth of 27,493 feet.

How Many Ships and Aircraft Have Disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle?

Some people have argued that there haven’t been more aircraft or ships disappearing in this part of the Atlantic Ocean than in any other region in the world. It’s impossible to know the exact number. However, there are two specific recorded incidents involving the United States military. 

Bermuda Triangle Mysteries: Supernatural or Science?

In March 1918, the USS Cyclops left Brazil and headed to Baltimore, Md. However, it disappeared inside the Bermuda Triangle. There has never been an explanation, and nobody has ever found any wreckage.

Decades later, a squadron of bombers disappeared in the airspace above the Bermuda Triangle. Like the USS Cyclops incident, no explanation or wreckage.

There are other records of disappearing ships and aircraft, but again, the exact number is unknown. According to Britannica, most estimates are around 50 ships and 20 aircraft. But whether or not these are mysterious disappearances remains debatable.

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Who Is Holiday Maker Travel LLC?

Based in Mechanicsville, Va., Holiday Maker Travel was the brainchild of Mike and Wendy Migliore in 2011. It’s a full-service leisure travel agency with opportunities for individual vacations and group travel. This includes travel to the Bermuda Triangle.

The company takes care of every detail so that customers can enjoy their holidays without worrying about anything. Together, Mike and Wendy have over 30 years of travel industry experience.

What Is the Ancient Mysteries Cruise?

The Ancient Mysteries Cruise allow guests to meet and interact with leading authors and researchers about the Ancient Alien Astronaut theories, Ancient Mysteries, and UFOs. Most of these experts have appeared on episodes of the History Channel’s TV series “Ancient Aliens.”

Looking out across the ocean from the sunny deck of a cruise ship.

During the cruise, Nick Pope, Nick Redfern, Peter Robbins, Micah Hanks, and Jim Harold present their research and findings. They also sit on a panel for discussion and Q&A. All of these activities are in the overall cost of the cruise.

How Much Does a Cruise Cost?

The five-night cruise aboard the Norwegian Cruise Line’s Norwegian Prima departs from New York City, N.Y., is all-inclusive. The cost covers all port charges, government fees and taxes, a private cocktail reception with the speakers, and dinner with the speakers.

It also includes an 8×10 group photo per cabin, more than 12 hours of lectures, presentations, panels, and Q&A sessions. Double occupancy dictates all prices.

An inside cabin costs $1,479, a balcony cabin located on the forward or aft costs $1,779, and a mid-ship balcony costs $1,829. Single occupancy, as well as other accommodations, are also available upon request. You can purchase travel insurance through Chubb.

Does the Bermuda Triangle Cruise Cost Extra?

The Twilight Bermuda Triangle Cruise is in the cost of the cabin rooms. This consists of a tour on a glass bottom boat during the darkness of night. The tour guide will identify various wildlife and plant life.

There are three options for shore excursions. One option explores the caves and waves of Bermuda. Another option explores the Colonial St. George fortifications. The last option combines snorkeling and scuba diving for a SNUBA adventure.

What Can I Expect on the Bermuda Triangle Cruise?

The cruise departs New York on Tuesday, March 28, 2023. During the two days at sea (Wednesday and Saturday), there are hours of presentations, lectures, and panel discussions with the featured speakers.

The Ancient Mysteries cruise promises “a full refund” if the ship disappears.

On Thursday, March 30, guests will arrive in Bermuda and have the opportunity to participate in the optional excursions and the Twilight Bermuda Triangle Cruise. Friday is a free day with optional excursions or relaxation. The cruise returns to New York on Sunday, April 2, 2023.

Is It Dangerous to Sail the Bermuda Triangle?

Sailing the Bermuda Triangle is not more dangerous than any other location in the world. In fact, according to Britannica, “In 2013, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) conducted an exhaustive study of maritime shipping lanes and determined that the Bermuda Triangle is not one of the world’s 10 most dangerous bodies of water for shipping.”

Tropical storms and hurricanes frequent this area of the Atlantic Ocean, and the strong Gulf Stream can cause sharp weather changes. These are the most dangerous aspects of sailing the Bermuda Triangle.

A woman holds her arms out to the open ocean while standing on the back of a ship.

Explore the Bermuda Triangle, If You Dare

You might side with Vincent Gaddis, the American author. He coined the term “Bermuda Triangle,” and believed that this area of the Atlantic Ocean really is full of mystery and danger.

You might be enthralled with paranormal activity or extraterrestrial beings and find the cruise by Holiday Maker Travel exciting and interesting.

Or, you might be someone who believes there’s a reason for everything, so there’s no need to fear this made-up tale about mysteriously vanishing ships and aircraft. 

Wherever you find yourself in this discussion, one this is for sure: the Bermuda Triangle Cruise is hotly popular. If you’re looking for conversation with experts in the field of aliens, mysteries, and UFOs, this is the vacation for you.

Will you be booking your cabin reservation anytime soon?

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